Narutojacket

We Believe In First-Rate Fashion

Women-run brand sells organic clothing crafted in Austin

Owner Miranda Bennett started the studio in November 2015. (Courtesy Kelly De Witt)

Miranda Bennett Studio, a sustainable clothing store located in East Austin next to the Texas State Cemetery, is an all-women business that carries its own brand of organically dyed and made-in-Austin clothing.

A brand that is followed by women of all ages—from their 20s to their 70s—for special occasion and daily wear, the online and brick-and-mortar business is run by a team of 10 women, including the owner and founder, Miranda Bennett.

“My ultimate goal is to be there for women at every stage of their life, providing clothing that makes them feel beautiful and comfortable. Our collection now fits Sizes 0-32,” Bennett said.

The brand also carries bridal and nursing-friendly attire. Customers can purchase clothes for work, and jewelry and accessories complete the look.

The store first opened in November 2015. The business also has a separate production space at the intersection of South Congress Avenue and William Cannon Drive. Customers would walk in to make their purchases and even try the clothes on, but when the pandemic hit, Bennett and her team worked to increase their online presence reaching a global audience as far as Canada, Europe and Australia.

“MBS is my attempt to work in a transparent way with people and planet at the forefront of all of our decision making,” Bennett said.

Bennett’s brand is her way of bringing consumers closer to where things are made. Her clothing line uses organic plant-based dyes to keep “toxic chemicals out of our waterways and off of our bodies.” The store restocked its organic cotton gauze, and the indigo tie-dyed everyday linen dress is made in Austin from start to finish. Its newest releases are the Martin Top and Walker Skirt.

In 2016, the business launched its MBS Zero Waste Initiative, a pledge to divert 100% of fabric scraps from landfills. It designs products made from fabric waste, recycling, selling and donating what it cannot use. Miranda Bennett Studio diverts 100% of its textile waste from landfills to promote its zero waste effort. An example is the Boro Bag ($22) made from an assortment of fabric remnants from the studio’s apparel collection. The bag may be used for crafting, quilting, gift giving, mending or other creative projects.

Other zero waste initiatives include using plant dyes made from byproducts of other industries, such as avocado pits and skins from Komé and sawdust from local sawmills; making compost out of leftover items; and designing new products around fabric scraps.

Miranda Bennett Studio

1211 E. 11th St., Ste. 101, Austin

512-432-5121

www.shopmirandabennett.com

Hours: Tue.-Sat. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m., closed Mon. Promoting zero waste