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Models wear nothing but tape on New York Fashion Week runway

They were hot and sticky.

Models redefined “sex tape” after strutting the New York Fashion Week Sunday catwalk in nothing but risqué attire composed entirely of different kinds of adhesive.

The hot and sticky showcase was part of the sold-out Black Tape Project, an unconventional sartorial initiative dreamed up by self-proclaimed body tape “pioneer” Joel Alvarez.

The so-called “King of Tape” premiered his latest line of tape-based swimwear at the Angel Orensanz Foundation in Manhattan Sunday night, mesmerizing audiences with his minimalist designs.

This latest display went even skimpier than usual — with the spartan black-and-white swimsuits barely concealing the models’ nether regions like live-action censor bars.

One of the models’ bodies was crisscrossed with spike-studded black tape — a salacious take on the dog collar design — with black X’s acting as pasties. Others had their lady parts obscured by nothing but a skimpy tape “flower” that was unattached to the rest of the getup.

Designer Joel Alvarez on the runway for the Black Tape Project at New York Fashion Week at the Angel Orensanz Foundation on Sept. 11 in New York City.

The sticky swimwear was the brainchild of the Black Tape Project founder, Joel Alvarez, who uses a smorgasbord of different adhesives to create swanky yet Spartan beach attire.
The sticky swimwear was the brainchild of Black Tape Project founder Joel Alvarez, who uses a smorgasbord of different adhesives to create swanky yet spartan beach attire.

Some of the models had only a few pieces of tape concealing their netherregions.
Some of the models had only a few pieces of tape concealing their bikini area.

A model walks the runway in her NSFW couture.
A model walks the runway in her NSFW couture.

In order to prevent discomfort — and perhaps an inadvertent bikini wax upon removal — Alvarez claims he uses “only skin-safe artistic body tape” in his clingy couture.

Per the Black Tape Project’s website, the unconventional patterns were inspired by an encounter the designer had while working as a rookie fashion photographer in 2008. The budding designer was reportedly working with a model who “suggested I use electrical tape on her for the last look,” he said.

While Alvarez initially had no idea why she would want to do this, he decided to oblige by wrapping her in black electrical tape, he recounted of his maiden bikini design.

“Mind you, she looked like two Christmas hams wrapped in rubber bands when I was done!” mused the fashionista, who currently boasts more than 630,000 followers on Instagram.

Fast forward a few years and it appeared that Black Tape was sticking around. By 2012, the tape maven began selling his “creative services to local nightclubs in Miami” and now showcases his designs at venues across the globe, per the fashion firm’s website.

Alvarez even allows aspiring fashionistas to try out the designs on themselves: He sells rolls of adhesive on the Black Tape Project’s website, where they cost from $9.99 for black body tape to $29.99 for other colors.

“I am focused on teaching and educating others by encouraging the world to try this new genre of body art with a collection of our own skin-safe body tape that I have curated from my own projects in the past,” he writes on the site. “This is the same tape that I use every day for my live performance designs and that you see in my portfolio.”